Alzheimer’s Disease Signs and Symptoms Help Identify Alzheimer’s Disease Early

There are a number Alzheimer’s disease signs and symptoms to be on the lookout for which can help diagnose this disease. The most prominent which is memory loss? What seems to be a simple mistake in memory may be the start of Alzheimer’s. Anyone can suffer short periods of forgetfulness. Alzheimer’s is much more than that; it actually attacks your short-term memory first. Then slowly keeps progressing.

Since 1906 when the German born psychiatrist Alois Alzheimer first discovered Alzheimer’s disease in a patient, until this very day. Alzheimer’s remains a fatal ailment that has both absolutely no cause as well as no known cure.

There are however medications to help slow this disease from developing into its final stages. In addition there are drugs already available that can assist the sufferer and manage the side effects of depression, hallucinations and delusions.

As Alzheimer’s disease signs and symptoms progress the patient will start to forget familiar things and will begin to lose well-known skills. The patient will begin to start forgetting people’s names. Then they will actually become unable to identify their friends and family.

It wouldn’t be fair to blame all memory loss on Alzheimer’s disease. There are two basic reasons for memory loss. Naturally the patient’s age is a factor.One of Ten people 65 years of age and older will be experiencing some form of Alzheimer’s. And 50% of people 85 years of age and older will also experience some form, Alzheimer’s.

Presently here in United States as of 2011 there are over 5 million sufferers. As the baby boomer generation begins to reach their golden years, this monster of a disease will be waiting for them. The first early sign of Alzheimer’s is memory loss. Alzheimer’s disease will first attack the frontal lobe where the short-term memory is stored, and in many cases not affect the patient’s long-term memory. But as the disease progresses the patient will lose more and more of their skills. It will affect the way an individual thinks their ability to speak, and their behavior.

The patient will become indecisive and can start having trouble within decision-making processes. These lapses of memory as well as cognitive functions are based on the frontal as well as temporal lobes of the brain.

The patient may experience mood swings and may become violent or even excessive passivity. The later on stages will be more terrible. Alzheimer’s patients will begin to loss control of their body functions and muscle control as well as mobility.

Alzheimer’s generally develops and become deadly within approximately 5 to 20 years.

Since Dr. Alzheimer identified the disease in 1903, there have been medical breakthroughs and research studies that have been discovered to be beneficial in preventing or even delaying Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers believe that physical exercise and eating properly can reduce the chance of contracting this disease.people with high blood pressure and high levels of cholesterol, and low levels of vitamin b appeared to be at higher risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease.

Gays and Lesbians Are Alcoholic Too

Alcoholism Is a Disease in the the Gay and Lesbian Population Too

Alcoholism is a disease affecting people of all races, nationalities, social strata, and sexual orientations. Though sometimes viewed historically as a self-indulgence, a lack of personal control or other character weakness, our modern understanding of alcoholism as a disease has opened the door to a wide range of options for those seeking recovery and sobriety.Alcoholics seeking to overcome their alcohol addiction and get sober often soon learn that interpersonal support is an important part of their recovery process. Having others with whom one can share experiences, and from whom one can learn what approaches work best, increases the likelihood of success. Rather than trying to stay sober alone, contact with others in similar circumstances can provide much-needed reassurance and encouragement during the recovery process. The more prevalent support options include group meetings, working one-on-one with others facing similar challenges, obtaining medical, psychological or professional counseling services, and participation in alcohol rehab programs and drug rehab centers that specialize in alcohol addiction.It is at this point of recovery that gay men and lesbians can often benefit from support mechanisms more tailored to the needs of their community.

Recovery from Alcoholism in the Gay & Lesbian Community

While alcoholism crosses all sexual orientations, gay and lesbian alcoholics in recovery often face unique challenges. The quality of care in an alcohol rehab program may be sometimes tainted by the prejudices of those providing it, or at a minimum be limited by the caregivers’ lack of knowledge of those aspects of gay society that distinguish it from the larger straight community. These limitations may become more pronounced when one seeks assistance from mainstream sobriety self-help groups, where prejudices and lack of knowledge can be more glaring in lay men and women who, though sober, lack professional helping skills. For those living outside of metropolitan areas where there is a large gay and lesbian population, the feelings of isolation and lack of social acceptance that many gay people experience can be intensified. These feelings can be worsened by the further isolation of dealing with addiction to alcohol, and getting sober itself can be hampered by imposing a social barrier to the interpersonal support that is widely regarded as so important to recovery. For these reasons having the means to make and maintain contact with sober gay men and sober lesbians can be vital to those seeking recovery.

Gay and Lesbian Relapse Prevention Whether gay, lesbian or bisexual, it is important to follow a certain set of guidelines if you hope to remain drug and alcohol free. If you have completed a stay in an alcohol rehab then you should become involved in their aftercare program. Most alcohol rehab programs have an aftercare program that meets at least once a month. In addition to attending aftercare in your alcohol rehab, daily attendance in meetings of alcoholics anonymous or gay AA meetings is imperative. Building a recovery network will prove to be invaluable. If you are looking for a gay friendly alcohol treatment program or a gay friendly alcohol rehab you can call 1-800-511-9225 or go to www.gay-rehab.com.

Dating With Herpes – What You Need to Know

Why is dating with herpes so stressful? After being diagnosed with herpes, people are worried that they might transfer the virus to their partner. There is a certain kind of stigma surrounding herpes and this is what makes it difficult for people to be open about their medical condition. Fortunately, dating with herpes isn’t as burdensome as some people think.

Here is all that you need to know about herpes dating.

• Herpes is, after all a disease: Understand that you are not your disease. Herpes doesn’t define who you are. Bear in mind that any kind of dating is associated with heart breaks, drama and pain. It isn’t right to blame your medical condition for such events.

Not everyone in this world dates for sex. People date because they like each other and have an emotional attachment. When these feelings are true, being diagnosed with herpes doesn’t really matter.

• Follow precautions: Sex is a part of relationship. When you have herpes and engage in sexual activities, there are chances that the herpes simplex virus might transmit. In order to prevent this from happening, it is advised that you use a condom. In addition, using suppressants such as acyclovir are also helpful.

A research has shown that women are more vulnerable to contracting herpes from their partners compared to men. Furthermore, abstain from having sex in the event of an outbreak.

• Herpes is very common: Most people worry that their friends and prospective partners would judge them on finding out that they are infected. Although, some people might judge them, this isn’t always the case. 20 percent of the adults in the United States have herpes and there are chances that the person you are dating already has it.

• Get ready to face rejection: People with sexually transmitted diseases are often disregarded in the society. Thanks to this orthodoxy, there are chances that you might get rejected. You will meet several people while dating who are looking for sex. They are the once who will certainly reject you on discovering about herpes.

Keep in mind that a person who truly loves you will not judge you based on whether you have herpes or not.

• Don’t hide it: If you are into dating and seriously looking for a partner, it is important to confess about herpes in the initial stages of dating. It makes no sense to take the relationship ahead and later telling about your medical condition.

The Truth About Red Wine and Heart Disease

Red Wine, Heart Disease, Hungry Sharks and Knights in Shining Armor

What is so special about wine? What is it that makes it potentially more protective against coronary heart disease, and perhaps other diseases, that other forms of alcohol?

In recent years, scientists have concluded without doubt that many human diseases such as heart disease, cancer and the aging process is caused or stimulated by a ravenous group of chemicals called free radicals, that act like hungry sharks. These highly charged little villains prowl the body and attack healthy cell membranes through a process that is called oxidation. In this scenario, there is however a knight in shining armor that jumps to the rescue and purges these ever hungry little killers. The name of our crusader is antioxidants.

Without getting too technical, the oxidation process in our bodies is crucial for health, without it, for instance, we would not be able to extract energy from our food. But if there are too many free radicals in our bodies this can be harmful.

Our body has its own defenses against free radicals, in the form of enzymes that are able to turn the hungry little sharks into harmless water. However, sometimes our body’s natural defense mechanisms can’t cope. Other times, external events can cause huge increases of free radicals within our bodies, such as x-rays, cigarette smoke and exposure to toxic substances. At times, this surge of free radicals can swamp our defenses and illnesses such as radiation sickness may take place.

So what does oxidation and free radicals have to do with heart disease?

Low density lipoproteins, commonly know as “bad” LDL, can penetrate and gather against the inner walls of our arteries, under certain conditions, forming fatty streaks and plaque. Taken alone, LDL particles aren’t so dangerous it seems, however, when attacked by free radicals they turn into dangerous and somewhat aggressive cells, capable of actually penetrating and harming the smooth inner walls of our arteries. This process is called oxidation. Oxidized LDL is known to be the culprit in stimulating atherosclerosis, heart disease and stroke.

Antioxidants, as the name suggests (anti-oxidants) can help stop the oxidation process, which are the results of free radicals doing their stuff. Most antioxidant research has been carried out on vitamins (A, E, beta carotene) but quite a lot of work has also been done on the healthy benefits of red wine. While most research on red wine has been done in relation to coronary heart disease, it seems that the benefits of wine don’t stop there.

Red wine and Coronary Heart Disease

Red wine contains a wide range of flavanoids; these are the chemicals that give the wine its particular taste and character, making one different from another. Many of these flavanoids act like antioxidants. Perhaps the forerunner of wine research was carried out by a certain Serge Renaud, who discovered the French Paradox, which suggested that wine was the decisive factor in protecting the people in southern France from their very high fat diets and ultimately coronary heart disease. Even if these people do eat large quantities of high fat cheese, pâté, and salami they have some of the lowest rates of heart disease in the world.

Another study, statistical rather than practical, by a Professor Grey of the University of Bern in Switzerland focused on the low, medium and high coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality figures of the World Health Organization.

What did he find? Well from among the high mortality areas were Finland and Scotland, the middle areas included Ireland, and the low CHD areas included Spain, Italy and France. He then compared heart attack rates with antioxidant levels in blood samples taken from men living in those areas.

Vitamin E and Heart Disease

What he found was very interesting, the results showed that high antioxidant levels, in particular vitamin E, coincided with low death rates of heart disease. Moreover, his results showed that vitamin E levels were 94% more accurate in predicting CHD rates than were cholesterol levels or blood pressure figures! Apart from diet, the high CHD regions drink very little, if any wine, whereas the low regions traditionally accompany their meals most days with wine.

It certainly seems strange that two much studied cities; Glasgow in Scotland and Toulouse in France show many similarities and yet many differences. The inhabitants of both cities eat tremendous amounts of high fat foods, traditionally take little exercise and drink alcohol. The surprising difference is that while the people of Glasgow have one of the highest rates of CHD in the world, the fortunate people of Toulouse have one of the lowest. Traditionally beer and spirits are the preferred drinks in Glasgow, while the folks in Toulouse drink red wine.

It has also been suggested that drinking in moderation together with meals is beneficial, while binge drinking at bars in the evening is harmful. It seems the southern Europeans don’t drink for the alcohol buzz, but just as a pleasant accompaniment to their meals.

At first the large heart institutions such as the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association ignored both antioxidants and frowned upon wine. While it is clear that it could be potentially dangerous for a physician to recommend his patients start drinking alcohol, it is also strange that they pretended for so many years to ignore the evidence. Well, now even if they don’t promote the taking of vitamin pills; antioxidants and free radicals are now recognized. However, according to the AHA “There is no scientific proof that drinking wine or any other alcoholic beverage can replace conventional measures. No direct comparison trials have been done to determine the specific effect of wine or other alcohol on the risk of developing heart disease or stroke. Just ask yourself who would pay for such studies. Clinical Trials have the purpose of showing one thing to be better than another, or whether a certain substance is beneficial to health. The costs of clinical trials is so high that only the pharmaceutical industry have the financial clout to invest in them – invest is the correct word. What a surprise.